• Parents,
     
    Under the Colorado Drinking Water Regulations, we are required to notify you of routine Lead water
    sampling results. As required, we did perform yearly Lead water sample tests. These water samples
    were taken on 8/23/2018. All samples came back well below maximum allowed levels, in fact, some
    samples were even below detectable levels. The drinking water at Ellicott Schools
    continues to be safe to drink and we strive to maintain this standard.
     
    Dave Sanger, Maintenance Director
    Jeremy Gardner, Water Operator
     

    Consumer Notice of Lead Tap Water Results

    <<Ellicott Elem Sr High School>> - PWSID: <<CO0221350>>
    Contact us at <<719-683-2700>> for more information about this notice.

     

    Esta es información importante.  Si no la pueden leer, necesitan que alguien se la traduzca.

    Dear Water Consumer,

    We are responsible for providing water at this location and ensuring that the drinking water we provide to you meets state and federal standards. This notice is to inform you of the lead tap monitoring results for the drinking water samples collected at the locations identified below:

    Location (eg. Sink)

    Date Collected

    Result (mg/L)

    Result ABOVE or BELOW 0.015 mg/L or 15 ppb Lead Action Level?

    Transportation Hand Sink

    8/23/2018

    .0047

    Below

    Middle School Nurse Sink

    8/23/2018

    .00083

    Below

    Middle School Boys RR

    8/23/2018

    .0015

    Below

    Middle School Kitchen

    8/23/2018

    .0019

    Below

    ElementarySchool Boys RR

    8/23/2018

    .00087

    Below

    ElementarySchool Kitchen

    8/23/2018

    .0018

    Below

    Elementary Nurse Sink

    8/23/2018

    .0011

    Below

    HighSchoolTeachersRoom

    8/23/2018

    >.00050

    Below

    High School Drama Room

    8/23/2018

    .0013

    Below

    High School Kitchen

    8/23/2018

    .00089

    Below

     

    What Does This Mean?
    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set the action level for lead in drinking water at 0.015 mg/L or 15 parts per billion (ppb). The action level is the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.  The Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. The EPA-set MCLG for lead is zero. 

    What Are The Health Effects of Lead?
    Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources.  It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women.  Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults.  Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother's bones, which may affect brain development.

    What Can I Do To Reduce Exposure to Lead in Drinking Water?

    1. Run your water to flush out lead. If it hasn’t been used for several hours, run the cold water tap until the temperature is noticeably colder. This flushes lead-containing water from the pipes. To conserve water, remember to catch the flushed tap water for plants or some other household use (e.g. cleaning).
    2. Always use cold water for drinking, cooking, and preparing baby formula. Never cook with or drink water from the hot water tap. Never use water from the hot water tap to make formula.
    3. Do not boil water to remove lead. Boiling water will not reduce lead.
    4. You may consider investing in a home water treatment device or alternative water source. When purchasing a water treatment device, make sure it is certified under Standard 53 by NSF International to remove lead. Contact NSF at 1-800-NSF-8010 or visit www.nsf.org. You may also visit the Water Quality Association’s website at www.wqa.org.
    5. Get your child's blood tested. Contact your local health department or healthcare provider to find out how you can get your child tested for lead if you are concerned about exposure.